Verification Martial Arts: A Verification Methodology Blog

SNUG-2012 Verification Round Up – Language & Methodologies – II

Posted by paragg on March 3rd, 2013

In my previous post, we discussed papers that leveraged SystemVerilog language and constructs, as well as those that covered broad methodology topics.  In this post, I will summarize papers that are focused on the industry standard methodologies: Universal Verification Methodology (UVM) and Verification Methodology Manual (VMM).

Papers on Universal Verification Methodology (UVM)

Some users prefer not to use the base classes of a methodology directly. Adding a custom layer enables them to add in additional capabilities specific to their requirements. This layer would consist of a set of generic classes that extend the classes of the original methodology. These classes provide a convenient location to develop and share the processes that are relevant to an organization for re-use across different projects. Pierre Girodias of IDT (Canada) in the paper, Developing a re-use base layer with UVMfocuses on the recommendations that adopters of these “methodologies” should follow while developing the desired ‘base’ layer.  In the paper typical problems and possible solutions are also identified while developing this layer. Some of these including dealing with the lack of multiple-inheritance and foraging through class templates.

UVM provides many features but fails to define a reset methodology, forcing users to develop their own methodology within the UVM framework to test the ‘reset’ of their DUT. Timothy Kramer of The MITRE Corporation in the paper “Implementing Reset Testingoutlines several different reset strategies and enumerates the merits and disadvantages of each. As is the case for all engineering challenges, there are several competing factors to consider, and in this paper the different strategies are compared on flexibility, scalability, code complexity, efficiency, and how easily they can be integrated into existing testbenches. The paper concludes by presenting the reset strategy which proved to be the most optimal for their application.

The ‘Factory’ concept in advanced OOP based verification methodologies like UVM is something that has baffled most verification engineers. But is it all that complicated? Not necessarily  and this is what is  explained by Clifford E. Cummings of Sunburst Design, Inc. in his paper– The OVM/UVM Factory & Factory Overrides – How They Works – Why They Are Important” . This paper explains the fundamental details related to the OVM/UVM factory and explain how it works and how overrides facilitate simple modification to the testbench component and transaction structures on a test by test basis. This paper not only explains why the factory should be used but also demonstrates how users can create configurable UVM/OVM based environments without it.

Register Abstraction Layer has always been an integral component of most of the HVL methodologies defined so far. Doug Smith of Doulos, in his paper, Easier RAL: All You Need to Know to Use the UVM Register Abstraction Layer”, presents a simple introduction to RAL. He distills the adoption of UVM RAL into a few easy and salient steps which is adequate for most cases. The paper describes the industry standard automation tools for the generation of register model.  Additionally the integration of the generated model along with the front-door and backdoor access mechanism is explained in a lucid manner.

The combination of the SystemVerilog language features coupled with the DPI & VPI language extensions can enable the testbench to generically react to value-changes on arbitrary DUT signals (which might or might not be part  of a standard interface protocol).  Jonathan Bromley, Verilab in “I Spy with My VPI: Monitoring signals by name, for the UVM register package and more”, presents a package which supports both value probing and value-change detection for signals identified at runtime by their hierarchical name, represented as a string. This provides a useful enhancement to the UVM Register package, allowing the same string to be used for backdoor register access.

Proper testing of most digital designs requires that error conditions be stimulated to verify that the design either handles them in the expected fashion, or ignores them, but in all cases recovers gracefully. How to do it efficiently and effectively is presented in “UVM Sequence Item Based Error Injectionby Jeffrey Montesano and Mark Litterick, Verilab. A self-checking constrained-random environment can be put to the test when injecting errors, because unlike the device-under-test (DUT) which can potentially ignore an error, the testbench is required to recognize it, potentially classify it, and determine an appropriate response from the design. This paper presents an error injection strategy using UVM that meets all of these requirements. The strategy encompasses both active and reactive components, with code examples provided to illustrate the implementation details.

The Universal Verification Methodology is a huge win for the Hardware Verification community, but does it have anything to offer Electronic System Level design? David C Black from Doulos Inc. explores UVM on the ESL front in the paperDoes UVM make sense for ESL?The paper considers UVM and SystemVerilog enhancements that could make the methodology even more enticing.

Papers on Verification Methodology Manual (VMM)

Joseph Manzella of LSI Corp in “Snooping to Enhance Verification in a VMM Environmentdiscusses situations in which a verification environment may have to peek at internal RTL states and signals to enhance results, and provides guidelines of what is an acceptable practice. This paper explains how the combination of vmm_log (logger class for VMM) and +vmm_opts (Command-line utility to change the different configurable values) helps in creating a configurable message wrapper for the internal grey-box testing. The techniques show how different assertion failures can be re-routed through the VMM messaging interface. An effective and reusable snooping technique for robust checking is also covered.

At Silicon Valley in Mechanism to allow easy writing of test cases in a SystemVerilog Verification environment, then auto-expand coverage of the test case Ninad Huilgol of VerifySys addresses designer’s apprehension of using a class based environment  through a  tool that leverages the VMM base classes. It  automatically expands the scope of the original test case to cover a larger verification space around it, based on a user friendly API that looks more like Verilog, hiding the complexity underneath.

Andrew Elms of Huawei in Verification of a Custom RISC Processorpresents the successful application of VMM to the verification of a custom RISC processer. The challenges in verifying a programmable design and the solutions to address them  are presented. Three topics explored in detail are the – Use of Verification Planner, Constrained random generation of instructions, Coverage closure.The importance of the Verification Plan as the foundation for the verification effort is explored. Enhancements to the VMM generators are also explored. By default VMM data generation is independent of the current design state, such as register values and outstanding requests. RAL and generator callbacks are used to address this. Finally, experiences with coverage closure are presented.

Keep you covered on the varied verification topics in the upcoming blog ahead!!! Enjoy reading!!!

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One Response to “SNUG-2012 Verification Round Up – Language & Methodologies – II”

  1. Verification Martial Arts » Blog Archive » SNUG-2012 Verification Round Up – Miscellaneous Topics Says:

    [...] co-simulation. Please find my earlier blogs on the other domains here: System Verilog Language, Methodologies & VCS [...]